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by DPP » Sun Mar 29, 2020 9:27 pm

{ Note by Mod: This thread has been spun-off from "Restoration of FF 119/133" thread, in which a slotted nut has been machined...]

Well spotted Grant, I turned the nut from some hex bar, and machine cut the thread which saved me buying a 3/4” tap. Then finished the slots on the mill.

I have a universal machine it is primarily a lathe with a milling head that can be swung round when needed, the lathe is good and quite versatile for a small machine. Last week I cleaned some brake discs up on it which you wouldn't be able to fit on most small machines, this does have a large swing over bed though.

The mill is handy bit is not as rigid as the lathe so smaller cuts have to be made to stop chatter.
I am very happy with it and dont know how I managed without it. Its amazing how many things you can think to do with it.

Its also very enjoyable making things from scratch.

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by RockyUSA » Mon Mar 30, 2020 5:23 am

Very cool.

I have an Atlas/Craftsman lathe....


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by johnw » Mon Mar 30, 2020 7:13 am

Very nice work Dave. Have you any tips for buying steel, hex bar and round in the UK, in imperial sizes ideally?
I can see you making dies or forms to make repair sections next!
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by DPP » Mon Mar 30, 2020 6:08 pm

johnw wrote:Very nice work Dave. Have you any tips for buying steel, hex bar and round in the UK, in imperial sizes ideally?
I can see you making dies or forms to make repair sections next!


When I got the machine I ordered a fair selection of brass, aluminium and plastic stock in a selection of sizes, I used https://www.aluminiumwarehouse.co.uk/ contry to their name they sell all sorts of materials in metric and imperial sizes.

The hex bar for the hub nuts was a bit difficult to find, but I managed to get a piece after a few phone calls.

For one off pieces of stock I sometimes use ebay as it is quick and easy.
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by Grant » Mon Mar 30, 2020 7:15 pm

That's a lovely machine you have there DaveImage, what a bonus having the milling part on top too.. I am very envious of that.. it will give you hours of fun and such tremendous enjoyment when removing the finished article you have made :P
The reason I was curious was that I have always wanted and felt I needed a lathe, just for simple things like cutting a spacer perfectly square at the end while doing alternator conversions etc and many many more other small jobs, I have never had a lathe in my tool kit/workshop and only ever really used one back at school days, I was in a friends speed boat last year and asked him about the centre of his steering wheel :lol: .. he said "Oh I made it on a Lathe".. I said I have always wanted one and he son piped up and said if you want a lathe I have one that is in my way.. I was there like a bullet and he kindly gave me itImage, it didn't have a stand but I picked one up from another lathe on Ebay that sort of suited the workshop..I haven't really used it yet as I have had work to do on the house, I did just set it up and turned a piece of brass with it just to see the vibe sort of thing.. I know I will find it such a useful thing to have.. but now I want a milling machine on-top like yours!!, I may have to do a rig up with a pillar drill or something.. I do have a pillar drill but it is not moveable!! :? .. Here's a pic of my lathe and I have just picked up a reversing switch for it too as the lathe can cut threads too, but I realise that is another thing to learn with all the different angles of thread pitches etc.. here's a couple of pics of it and you may see a steering wheel in the workshop too :lol: >>
>>

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by RockyUSA » Mon Mar 30, 2020 8:33 pm

That's a really sweet lathe, Grant...

Especially excellent with that Quick-Change Gear Box.

The first thing you will find you want is a "Quick Change Tool Post".

Then you will need to buy lots of tooling, like Right Handed cutters / Grooving/Cut-Off Tool, Knurling attachment, etc.

You should try and find the Atals "Manual of Lather Operations" (MOLO) book - even if that's not the same kind of lathe, it's got a tremendous amount of useful information.

Maybe we should start a new thread on "Garage Machinists".

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by Dion » Mon Mar 30, 2020 8:34 pm

Same here. Only worked with a lathe for a couple of hours at school, then never again. Always wanted one. The time came when my garage was extended and big enough to install one. I got this one, a Harrison from around 1953, cheap because it was so old. It had been at the second hand machines shop for a few years. He offered to bring it which was good because it is very heavy! It is in pretty good condition.
We used it to adapt steering columns to accept modern electric power steering. Pics just after delivery and after a couple of years.

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by Grant » Mon Mar 30, 2020 8:44 pm

Yes I don't want to hijack Daves FF thread.. why don't we post any further stuff in the Man Cave Thread which is where I was going to add these pics and some more of my workshop to that thread as I have been clearing up out there.. so sorry Dave and we shall let your thread as be :wink:

[Note by Moderator VFK44 : The posts not directly relating to FF 119/133 have now been moved to two different threads in General Discussion - "sheds and workshops" and "Machine Tools"]
Sheds: https://www.joc.org.uk/forum/viewtopic.php?f=2&t=29953
Machine Tools: https://www.joc.org.uk/forum/viewtopic.php?f=2&t=30690
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by DPP » Mon Mar 30, 2020 9:52 pm

No worries Grant, I love to see others workshops/mancaves.
Thats a nice lathe you have, once you start using it you will think of lots of uses for it.

I finished my nuts today, now made 5 off them 2 each for FF133, FF182 and a spare one.
Whilst I was making them the wife asked me to look at the pump in the pond as she was clearing it out, it was always a bit too powerful so I made a flow restrictor from a piece of nylon in 10 minutes so another job sorted.

Have a look at milling on a lathe videos on youtube and you might decide against getting a mill, basically you put the cutting tool in the lathe with a collet and then fit your material in a little device on the carriage.

The lathe is where most work is done it has only been cutting the slots in the nuts and a little milling on my steering column mount where I have used the mill. The interesting part of machining is to try and find ways around problems with the machinery and tooling you have.
I had only done a few weeks of basic machining at college as part of my apprenticeship many years ago until recently, you just need to have a go. A great starting project is a machinists hammer, this will get you learning quickly whilst making something useful.
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by johnw » Tue Mar 31, 2020 7:29 am

DPP wrote:Have a look at milling on a lathe videos on youtube and you might decide against getting a mill, basically you put the cutting tool in the lathe with a collet and then fit your material in a little device on the carriage.

What Dave might be saying is that a lathe and a mill are the same thing, that on a mill the cutter rotates, and the work piece is moved turning the handle on the slide, and that you can do the same thing on a lathe with a cutter in the main chuck, and the work fitted to the slide. So in theory a mill is just luxury bling. Although having said that, to make anything all you really need is a file and a hammer! :D

Also you can do basic lathe and polishing work, with an electric drill held in a vice and hand tools. Not very safe! :o That is a fantastic lathe though Grant. Good and solid looking. Nice long bed, so you could do work on FF drive shafts. I recommend watching clickspring on youtube for lathe work. The quality of his videos is fantastic, and it is all brief and to the point.

If anyone is thinking of buying a lathe, try and get one with lots of tools and accessories, as they cost the money. In Switzerland large and once expensive lathes and milling machines are available almost for free to anyone who can collect them, £1 to £50 typically, with the smaller ones with lots of accessories fetching serious money. Chinese tooling off ebay will get you going, but even the price of that soon adds up.
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by VFK44 » Wed Apr 01, 2020 2:15 pm

[Note by Moderator VFK44 : The posts not directly relating to restoration of FF 119/133 have now been moved to two different threads in General Discussion - "sheds and workshops" and "Machine Tools"]
Sheds: https://www.joc.org.uk/forum/viewtopic.php?f=2&t=29953
Machine Tools: https://www.joc.org.uk/forum/viewtopic.php?f=2&t=30690

I think the two are sufficiently different to deserve two topics.
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by johnw » Wed Apr 01, 2020 9:15 pm

johnw wrote:
DPP wrote:In Switzerland large and once expensive lathes and milling machines are available almost for free to anyone who can collect them, £1 to £50 typically, with the smaller ones with lots of accessories fetching serious money. Chinese tooling off ebay will get you going, but even the price of that soon adds up.


Here is an example, my new to me milling machine.
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It is Italian, C Magnoni, early or pre war from what I gather, so one of Mussolini's finest :D :shock:. They were rebranded Arno after the war. A good solid piece of kit. This one weighed a good tonne when I tried to move it. It is 3 phase, 3 speed reduction gearbox, powered table. It needs a coolant pump, that was missing, and the bronze bearings in the vertical heads (it came with two vertical heads) need making up on the lathe, and the shaft bearing surface will need refacing on a rotary surface grinder. The Swiss rotary surface grinder I bought :D (a Studer) cost more or less the same as this one :-), The Studer is a bit of a stunner in terms of build quality. The Magnoni runs nicely after a quick clean and lube. Horizontal milling works OK, but I don't have the attachment for heavy duty horizontal support, but should be able to mill one up!
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by DPP » Wed Apr 01, 2020 9:27 pm

Wow John thats a serious bit of kit and these old machines are so well made, it will be well worth the effort in restoring it.

There wont be much you cant do on a machine that size.
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by Dion » Wed Apr 01, 2020 9:41 pm

What a wonderful big machine. Very good of you to give it a second life.
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by Grant » Wed Apr 01, 2020 9:42 pm

johnw wrote:
johnw wrote:
DPP wrote:In Switzerland large and once expensive lathes and milling machines are available almost for free to anyone who can collect them, £1 to £50 typically, with the smaller ones with lots of accessories fetching serious money. Chinese tooling off ebay will get you going, but even the price of that soon adds up.


Here is an example, my new to me milling machine.
CropWhatsApp Image 2019-09-22 at 12.35.59.tiff


I wonder why I cannot see the imageImage DANG!!
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