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E10 Fuel to be introduced from next year

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by Steve Payne » Sat Mar 28, 2020 12:09 pm

slotcarone wrote:Steve just yesterday I responded the same way when someone that is restoring a 289 Cobra was planning on using 50 year old NOS brake pads! :)


I get it that some people feel keeping there pride and joy original but safety should always come first. I wonder how there insurance company would view it?

In truth some of these modern parts we want to fit will probably out last the car.

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by MikeWilliams » Sat Mar 28, 2020 5:17 pm

Are NOS brake pads such a bad idea? They probably contain asbestos and work far better than the modern ones? Maybe? I went to great lengths on my 1938 Jensen to find NOS brake linings because of just that - they work better!

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by Steve Payne » Sat Mar 28, 2020 5:27 pm

It is the adhesive or the corrosion on the metal under the pad I would be worried about after such a long period.

As far as pad material some of the materials that are now made make Asbestos very old school with out any of the health problems that Asbestos can bring.

I like the EBC range of pads and you can find one to suit your style of driving for most vehicles classic and modern.

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by slotcarone » Sat Mar 28, 2020 11:21 pm

What Steve said exactly!! :)
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by johnw » Sat Mar 28, 2020 11:49 pm

slotcarone wrote:Steve just yesterday I responded the same way when someone that is restoring a 289 Cobra was planning on using 50 year old NOS brake pads! :)

Ah the authentic taste in the mouth of asbestos dust! The lingering smell of the dust in the garage after a fast run, all the family can enjoy! :( :shock: :?

It is a shame that the pipe from the mechanical pump to the carb on so many of our cars gets replaced with rubber or hacked off at the ends. The old steel piping and insulation should last indefinitely. Replacement mechanical pumps will have internals that better cope with modern fuels, but so many replacements have the inlet and outlets pointing the wrong way. I messed up on the last one I bought. All the underbonnet pipework can be kept original looking in theory. Jegs list a stainless steel fuel pipe from the pump to the carb,I just can't see that being the right one! Flaring stainless pipe and making the correct tight bends doesn't seem viable although it is tempting to try. I would like to make stainless brake piping, and while I am at it Maxaret Valve pipes :D.

Something that is more realistic, is perhaps black braided low pressure brake fluid pipe, to go from the fluid reservoir to the master cylinder. Does anyone sell that?
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by kees » Sun Mar 29, 2020 8:51 am

Stainless steel brake pipe is not a good idea. Hard to bend and nearly impossible to make the correct flares.
The way to go is Kunifer. Kunifer or Nicopp lines (copper/nickel/iron alloy) are marine grade, DOT approved, not prone to fatigue cracking like stainless steel or copper tubing (illegal) and very easy to bend and make flares. It does not rot. Used as standard on many cars e.g. Volvo's and used by them from the '70's on.
The only draw back is that it is fairly expensive.
Stainless steel is fine for a fixed fuel line but use rubber or spiralled copper tubing if there is some movement, e.g. body to engine.
Regarding fuel pumps I much prefer the old 3-layered diaphragms of electric SU pumps to the so called modern fuel resistant single layer diaphragms sold by Burlen. I have seen several failures from the modern diaphragms but never found a failing old diaphragm other than when the Mylar layer between fuel and rubber was damaged (punctured or torn by careless fitting) even on 50+ years old pumps. When rebuilding these pumps I always fit the older diaphragms.
Stainless steel braided Teflon brake fluid line can be made up by several shops. Perhaps Goodridge has ready made items?
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by VFK44 » Mon Mar 30, 2020 10:32 pm

johnw wrote:Something that is more realistic, is perhaps black braided low pressure brake fluid pipe, to go from the fluid reservoir to the master cylinder. Does anyone sell that?


https://www.thehosemaster.co.uk/fueltex-cotton-overbraid-hose/

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by kees » Tue Mar 31, 2020 10:05 am

I doubt this is brake fluid proof.
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