The Jensen Owners' Club A technical and discussion forum for all Jensen enthusiasts It is currently Mon Nov 12, 2018 6:07 pm

General Discussion

Fire extinquisher

You can discuss anything here, Jensen related or not. Technical discussions / questions may be moved to the correct Forum.

by Anton001 » Wed Oct 17, 2018 7:34 pm

Hi all,
I am looking for a fire extinquisher for my Jensen(s). Anyone who has experience with the following system?

https://www.sensetek.nl/en/automatic-su ... n-systems/
Jensen Healey Mk1 1123 / 11016
Jensen Interceptor MK2 123 / 3572
Jensen C-V8 MK3 112 / 2419
Jensen 541S / S1079


www.jensenholland.nl
User avatar
Anton001
 
Posts: 1293
Joined: Tue Sep 28, 2010 5:04 pm
Location: Netherlands

by RAP72 » Wed Oct 17, 2018 8:02 pm

User avatar
RAP72
V8 Lover
 
Posts: 3845
Joined: Wed Nov 30, 2005 7:11 pm
Location: Huntingdon, cambs

by Rohan Christmas » Thu Oct 18, 2018 10:57 pm

I have one of these systems: http://www.spa-uk.co.uk/Products/ViewProds/24
Having never pressed the button I don't know how well it works! Due to testing required and the associated costs I'm going to switch to a handheld extinguisher instead of replacing my current cylinder.

Copy of IMG_0179_1_1.JPG
Copy of IMG_0179_1_1.JPG (118.3 KiB) Viewed 294 times

Initial 058.jpg
Initial 058.jpg (133.11 KiB) Viewed 294 times
1964 Jensen CV-8 II
Rohan Christmas
 
Posts: 94
Joined: Tue Apr 22, 2014 10:20 pm
Location: Riverina, NSW, Australia

by kees » Sat Oct 20, 2018 4:36 pm

First check your insurance cover very closely. If that covers the fire and you happen to have a powder extinguisher, just walk away and let the car burn. The powder can be very corrosive and is very hard to remove rendering the car into a rusted hull in few years time. So do not go for powder extinguishers. BCF (illegal) or the modern equivalent, CO2, foam should all work fine but you need a large enough extinguisher, 5kg is usually OK, 2kg the absolute minimum and the puny little 1kg affairs are just fine for extinguishing a match. All extinguishers have to be checked/refilled/renewed periodically or be replaced every so often. But nobody is ever checking them so if you do not maintain them, just forget about fitting them.
I have BCF in the kitchen, the garage and the car.
Kees Oudesluijs
kees
 
Posts: 1740
Joined: Sun Jun 25, 2006 9:35 pm
Location: Heerjansdam NL

by johnw » Sat Oct 20, 2018 5:06 pm

kees wrote:First check your insurance cover very closely. If that covers the fire and you happen to have a powder extinguisher, just walk away and let the car burn.


Is it not sufficient to promptly wash off the powder? Maybe Jet wash?
--
John Wild
Working on: LHD 1973 Mk3 Interceptor J series, 119/122.
Previous FFs: 119/006, 119/73, 119/123, 119/132, 127/255, 127/289. Current: 119/036 (remains stolen unrecovered).
User avatar
johnw
 
Posts: 240
Joined: Wed Sep 15, 2010 7:38 pm

by kees » Sat Oct 20, 2018 6:06 pm

No. It just creeps in all nooks and crannies which cannot be reached Also using water will increase the damage. The powder is a salt that dissolves into water which will than creep even further in all kinds of crevasses. It is like dipping the car into the sea.
Kees Oudesluijs
kees
 
Posts: 1740
Joined: Sun Jun 25, 2006 9:35 pm
Location: Heerjansdam NL

by Fishyboy » Sat Oct 20, 2018 7:48 pm

Hi all,
I have been advised by several people to switch from the Dry Powder/CO2 and go for one on the nano particle type which leave no residue after use and cause less damage than the older types.

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/JE-50-PFE-1- ... 2749.l2649

Video:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1TXgKt7X-z4

Here is the "blurb".

The JE50 unit is the size of a medium torch but packs the punch of a 2kg dry powder or 5kg co2 extinguisher, There is minimal residue, unlike others.The unit is approved by Rina, SGS and is CE approved, Non hazardous, human safe, non toxic. Non pressurised, Environmentally safe
Can be used for all types of fires, no more wondering which one to use.

Our JE50 fire extinguisher is a GREEN AGENT product that is environmentally friendly, non toxic and safe.


Will these be less damaging than the more traditional type?

Phil
J.O.C. Member 10659
1969 Mk II Interceptor 123/3588
1968 Volvo 1800S
1961 Austin Healey 3000 BT7
User avatar
Fishyboy
 
Posts: 159
Joined: Wed May 17, 2017 5:25 pm
Location: Andover, Hampshire

by kees » Sat Oct 20, 2018 8:57 pm

No experience with those. No specification of the chemicals used or if these are corrosive.
Kees Oudesluijs
kees
 
Posts: 1740
Joined: Sun Jun 25, 2006 9:35 pm
Location: Heerjansdam NL

by kenny38 » Sun Oct 21, 2018 9:16 am

One of our local club members (Classic and Vintage) Has a 76 Roller. He keeps it in great condition. Sent to Sydney specialist recently for brake overhaul plus at cost of $14K. On driving car back on approach to Harbour Bridge, car had an under bonnet fire and was subsequently written off at agreed value. Assesor said probably a brake hose broke and usual happened. Owner paid out in full but but out of pocket $14K.Mechanic insurance co says "Nope....sue us". Legal advice say it would be hard to prove and fees would be spectacular. Owner now has a Roller 89. Beautiful condition and a medal winner in RR club. Deceased estate. Kenny38 :cry:
kenny38
 
Posts: 385
Joined: Tue Aug 25, 2015 8:24 am
Location: Australia

by johnw » Sun Oct 21, 2018 12:54 pm

I have since been googling about cleaning up after dry powder use. You need to wear gloves, a mask, vacuum it up, then wash residue off with a neutralising solution containing vinegar or similar. There is lots of info, about cleaning it off, about it attacking even fabric if left, etc.

About brake fluid, the Interceptor reservoirs are particularly susceptible to leaking when aged. A cylinder with integral reservoir seems appealing given fire risks, however some of these have metric threads so take care! I wonder if an apprentice was working on the Rolls, not a particularly expensive model the 76 if it was a standard Shadow, and perhaps forced a metric thread in somewhere?

kenny38 wrote:One of our local club members (Classic and Vintage) Has a 76 Roller. He keeps it in great condition. Sent to Sydney specialist recently for brake overhaul plus at cost of $14K. On driving car back on approach to Harbour Bridge, car had an under bonnet fire and was subsequently written off at agreed value. Assesor said probably a brake hose broke and usual happened. Owner paid out in full but but out of pocket $14K.Mechanic insurance co says "Nope....sue us". Legal advice say it would be hard to prove and fees would be spectacular. Owner now has a Roller 89. Beautiful condition and a medal winner in RR club. Deceased estate. Kenny38 :cry:
--
John Wild
Working on: LHD 1973 Mk3 Interceptor J series, 119/122.
Previous FFs: 119/006, 119/73, 119/123, 119/132, 127/255, 127/289. Current: 119/036 (remains stolen unrecovered).
User avatar
johnw
 
Posts: 240
Joined: Wed Sep 15, 2010 7:38 pm

by kees » Sun Oct 21, 2018 1:55 pm

johnw wrote:I have since been googling about cleaning up after dry powder use. You need to wear gloves, a mask, vacuum it up, then wash residue off with a neutralising solution containing vinegar or similar. There is lots of info, about cleaning it off, about it attacking even fabric if left, etc.

You can only wash it off and neutralise it sufficiently superficially. Because the powder is so fine it will penetrate into places which cannot be reached and checked afterwards, causing havoc in the coming years out of sight with rust braking through the surface after some/many years.
Kees Oudesluijs
Last edited by kees on Mon Oct 22, 2018 9:31 am, edited 1 time in total.
kees
 
Posts: 1740
Joined: Sun Jun 25, 2006 9:35 pm
Location: Heerjansdam NL

by johnw » Mon Oct 22, 2018 9:19 am

kees wrote:You can only wash it off and neutralise it sufficiently superficiality. Because the powder is so fine it will penetrate into places which cannot be reached and checked afterwards, causing havoc in the coming years out of sight with rust braking through the surface after some/many years.
Kees Oudesluijs


Added to that there is also the issue of accidental discharge in the car with powder! This may be more likely than a fire, especially if you have other people's kids in the car! Less so with CO2, and BCF (a type of Haylon) seems best in that respect. New haylon production is banned, but use and recycling is not.

https://fogmaker.com/ Another in car system.

Meanwhile I will think about some kind of electrical isolator switch installation, accessible from in the car.
--
John Wild
Working on: LHD 1973 Mk3 Interceptor J series, 119/122.
Previous FFs: 119/006, 119/73, 119/123, 119/132, 127/255, 127/289. Current: 119/036 (remains stolen unrecovered).
User avatar
johnw
 
Posts: 240
Joined: Wed Sep 15, 2010 7:38 pm

by Jens » Thu Oct 25, 2018 9:15 am

Powder IS horrible to clean - just going through that :(
Attachments
D2742904-3F30-4C74-9A62-29F1F82F2F76.jpeg
D2742904-3F30-4C74-9A62-29F1F82F2F76.jpeg (144.38 KiB) Viewed 77 times
E45A9290-4B99-4737-BA67-DF7C938189EB.jpeg
E45A9290-4B99-4737-BA67-DF7C938189EB.jpeg (142.62 KiB) Viewed 77 times
6739FA08-573E-46D2-A95B-8E68DC40CFC1.jpeg
6739FA08-573E-46D2-A95B-8E68DC40CFC1.jpeg (214.89 KiB) Viewed 77 times
In order of appearance:

C-V8 Mk III 112/2432
541 S 102/1035
FF MkII 127/243
Healey Mk II 1140/14406
Jensen GT 1610/30257
C-V8 Mk III 112/2326
User avatar
Jens
Dr. Umlaut & Area Rep for Germany
 
Posts: 4259
Joined: Wed Feb 01, 2006 9:17 pm
Location: Dresden, Germany

by johnw » Thu Oct 25, 2018 10:30 am

I was thinking about you as I read this thread. There are lots of posts on the net about cleaning it off, keep it dry and vacuuming while wearing protective clothing seems a good start. Not Jet wash/water as I speculated above (sorry!) and Kees corrected. One person recommended removing intake manifolds as an absolute minimum, as someone speculated that a stuck corroded ring on a newly built engine was caused by putting out a small fire 500 miles earlier. I guess hovering, stripping down and hoovering keeping it away from other stuff. Your bonnet looks really good. I guess that is easy to get stripped and tanked.
--
John Wild
Working on: LHD 1973 Mk3 Interceptor J series, 119/122.
Previous FFs: 119/006, 119/73, 119/123, 119/132, 127/255, 127/289. Current: 119/036 (remains stolen unrecovered).
User avatar
johnw
 
Posts: 240
Joined: Wed Sep 15, 2010 7:38 pm

by Jens » Thu Oct 25, 2018 10:47 am

The bonnet is my smallest concern - that bloody powder is/was EVERYWHERE.

I have started to dismantle the whole car, there simply is no alternative. And the further I go the more the words "complete nut and bolt restoration" appear on the horizon. :shock:
Attachments
IMG_9367.JPG
IMG_9367.JPG (103.2 KiB) Viewed 71 times
IMG_9403.JPG
IMG_9403.JPG (155.18 KiB) Viewed 71 times
In order of appearance:

C-V8 Mk III 112/2432
541 S 102/1035
FF MkII 127/243
Healey Mk II 1140/14406
Jensen GT 1610/30257
C-V8 Mk III 112/2326
User avatar
Jens
Dr. Umlaut & Area Rep for Germany
 
Posts: 4259
Joined: Wed Feb 01, 2006 9:17 pm
Location: Dresden, Germany

Next

Return to General Discussion