The Jensen Owners' Club A technical and discussion forum for all Jensen enthusiasts It is currently Wed Dec 11, 2019 1:10 am

Members' Cars

SEA770: 541 with V8 (331 hemi)

Here's where to post photos of your cars. We all want to see your Jensens!

by johnw » Thu Jun 20, 2019 5:42 pm

felixkk wrote:re dog problem: my father in law has a stuffed baby deer, or would that be weird? (No he didn‘t shoot it, it was a mowing accident)

No, a deer would appear quite normal. Just one thing though, has father in law ever lived in Canada? That could cause confusion. I explain: https://youtu.be/I2t5KKFeHR0
--
John Wild
User avatar
johnw
 
Posts: 505
Joined: Wed Sep 15, 2010 7:38 pm

by felixkk » Thu Jun 20, 2019 6:43 pm

:D :D :D No, he‘s left Switzerland only once- for his honeymoon. And that was to neighbouring Austria :shock:
Felix Kistler C-V8 112/2454, 541DL 2223849
"You Secret Little Monkey"
JOC 9465
Secretary/VP JCC Jensen Car Club of Switzerland
User avatar
felixkk
 
Posts: 2669
Joined: Tue Aug 24, 2010 6:19 am
Location: Zurich, Switzerland

by felixkk » Sun Sep 08, 2019 3:03 pm

On the introduction of the V8 at Bristol. From Motor Sport, Page 13, September 1964

Two Anglo Americans - "MOTOR SPORT" Calls on Jensen and Bristol

„... Around 1957, however, re-organisation of the factory at Filton coupled with the fact that Hawker-Siddeley had dropped car production, caused repercussions, and the manufacture of car engines by Bristol was abandoned.

They had, in any case, realised that something new was required and had designed a number of experimental engines, with a V8 in an advanced state on the drawing-board. It was felt that the new car should have automatic transmission and every kind of gearbox in this category—Hobbs, Borg-Warner, Hydramatic, Flight-o-Matic and Torqueflite—was tried, the verdict going very much in favour of the last-named, after Bristol had tried their hand at making an automatic box of their own, in conjunction with Smiths.

Having decided that they wanted a Chrysler transmission, the Bristol engineers found it logical to employ a Chrysler V8 engine. American foundry methods are notable for excellent lightweight aluminium castings, and to reach similar standards for an output of 10 or 20 engines a week would have entailed enormous tooling costs, apart from the undesirability of matching a specialised transmission to an engine for which it wasn't designed.

So a Chrysler power unit was adopted, a Canadian-built type 313, with a high performance power pack—special camshaft, four-barrel carburetter, etc.—chosen by the Bristol engineers. They also decided to have nothing to do with hydraulic tappets and the engines are supplied with mechanical tappets installed.

Tests were carried out in England, Bristol doing their own development work in harmony with the Chrysler Corporation in the States. For instance, full-throttle motorway driving could have produced bearing failures, but the engine proved entirely satisfactory. Experiments were made with higher peak revs. under kick-down, to the extent of extending the change-up point by some 8 or 10 m.p.h., but overall acceleration times were unaffected. In carrying out such tests the Brabazon runway adjacent to the factory proved extremely useful.

Chrysler had just introduced the Californian smog pack and this was adopted as being an ideal method of keeping fumes out of the car interior. In particular, Chrysler's ball and trunnion propeller shaft joint was found to function exceedingly well, ironing out transmission problems.

Small modifications to the 98.5 x 84.1 mm. (5,130 c.c.) 250-b.h.p. 90° V8 engine to enable it to go into the Bristol 408 box-section chassis, such as shortening the dip-stick, altering water outlets, tapping heater connections, modifying the gearbox extension and so on, are done at Filton, surplus parts removed from the imported engines being scrapped. So far as larger mods. are concerned, like manifolding, pulley sizes, etc., Chrysler were able to provide what was required from amongst the parts for their range of engines.

The Torqueflite transmission is cooled by an oil radiator let into the base of the water radiator, oil being circulated through this by the gearbox pump at over 30 lb./sq. in.

Calculations were made to see whether any engine cooling problems would arise, working in conjunction with J. W. Lawrence, the radiator manufacturer, and by pushing air through the radiator by means of two thermostatically-controlled, cowled fans mounted side-by-side in front of it, using a therrno-switch in the underside of the header tank, temperatures remained in conformity with the theoretical checks. The cooling system is pressurised at 14 lb./sq. in. The very ingenious and compact push-button control unit for the Torqueflite transmission fitted easily on the right of the Bristol facia after a new bracket had been made for it. This is a very satisfactory control unit, neatly illuminated via the fluorescent buttons, rheostat-controlled in company with the instrument lighting.“
Felix Kistler C-V8 112/2454, 541DL 2223849
"You Secret Little Monkey"
JOC 9465
Secretary/VP JCC Jensen Car Club of Switzerland
User avatar
felixkk
 
Posts: 2669
Joined: Tue Aug 24, 2010 6:19 am
Location: Zurich, Switzerland

Previous

Return to Members' Cars